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What is an interview in refugee procedure and how to prepare for it?

Read this short information to prepare for your interview in the refugee procedure. If you have additional questions, please contact our lawyers at porady@pomocprawna.org or call at: +48 693 390 502

 

An interview is the most important piece of evidence in the refugee procedure!

 

On its basis, the Office for Foreigners (Urząd do spraw Cudzoziemców) collects information and learns about what happened in your life, the reason why you had to flee your country of origin, and the reason why you cannot return there.

 

Everything you say during the interview and the information collected will be the basis of a decision in your case. It means, that the answers that you give during the interview are very important – they will be used to decide if you should receive protection in Poland or you should be sent back to your country.

 

The interview will be conducted in the language you understand and speak. You have the right to ask for an interpreter in case you feel more comfortable in your native language.

 

If there is a point or question you did not understand during the interview, it is very important to speak up and ask your inspector and ask him or her to explain the question again.

 

If you are a victim of violence, it is recommended to ask, before the interview, for a psychologist to join and be present. You can also ask to be interviewed by a man or a woman.

 

Since in Poland we do not always know the situation of your country, it is important to explain everything to your inspector in detail. This will allow the inspector to understand what happened and the reason why it is dangerous for you to return to your country.


At the beginning of the interview, you may be asked about your travel: how you arrived in Poland, where you used to live before (which city, address), what were your activities, the place you worked in, whether your family remained in your country, and in this case, whether you are still in touch with them.

 

Then you will be asked about the reason why you left your country: when you started to have problems in your country, for what reason, did someone threaten or hurt you, were You detained or arrested, were You subject to violence or torture, whether you tried to get help in your country, whether you tried to stay in your country but in another place, or another city. If you did not try to get help or move to another place in your country, the inspector will also ask for a reason. You should remember to tell the inspector about your individual situation, not only the general situation in Your home country.

 

It is important to explain everything in detail, the more details you give, the better. Taking part in an interview is not always easy, but it is important to be clear and transparent to build trust with your inspector.

 

If there is anything you do not remember, say it out loud and clearly at the interview. It is normal not to remember everything with all the details, and there are no good or bad answers in this interview. It is important, however, to always tell the truth.

 

The most important during the interview is to explain the reasons why, if you had to return to your country, you would have problems there and what kind of problems that would be.

 

It is important to avoid getting confused, avoid making mistakes on dates, places, what happened in your life and when. This can be difficult so before the interview, it is recommended to prepare yourself by writing down your history on a piece of paper. Since the interview can be stressful, such a document can help You ensure that all facts and information are in order.

 

After the interview, you will receive a transcript – this is a document with all the questions and answers written down. It is important to keep it. If You have a lawyer, it is recommended to send them a scan or a copy as soon as possible.

 

Please remember that the Office for Foreigners cannot show or disclose your interview to anyone. It is confidential and your answers will only be used to determine if you should receive refugee status in Poland.

 

 

13 September 2022